Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 149–156

Physical Activity and Health Outcomes Among HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Longitudinal Mediational Analysis

Authors

    • Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Harvard Medical School
    • The Fenway Institute
  • Kenneth H. Mayer
    • Harvard Medical School
    • The Fenway Institute
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Heidi Crane
    • University of Washington
  • Jessica F. Magidson
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Harvard Medical School
  • Chris Grasso
    • The Fenway Institute
  • W. Christopher Mathews
    • University of California San Diego Medical Center
  • Michael S. Saag
    • University of Alabama Birmingham
  • Steven A. Safren
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Harvard Medical School
    • The Fenway Institute
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-013-9489-3

Cite this article as:
Blashill, A.J., Mayer, K.H., Crane, H. et al. ann. behav. med. (2013) 46: 149. doi:10.1007/s12160-013-9489-3

Abstract

Background

Low physical activity is associated with depression, which may, in turn, negatively impact antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV-infected individuals; however, prior studies have not investigated the relationships between physical inactivity and ART non-adherence.

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the association of physical inactivity, depression, ART non-adherence, and viral load in HIV-infected men who have sex with men.

Methods

The sample (N = 860) was from a large, multicenter cohort of HIV-infected patients engaged in clinical care.

Results

Across time, depression mediated the relationship between physical inactivity and ART non-adherence (γ = 0.075) and the relationship between physical inactivity and viral load (γ = 0.05). ART non-adherence mediated the relationship between depression and viral load (γ = 0.002) and the relationship between physical inactivity and viral load (γ = 0.009).

Conclusions

Low levels of physical activity predicted increased depression and poor ART adherence over time, which subsequently predicted higher viral load.

Keywords

HIV/AIDSPhysical activityDepressionAdherenceViral load

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2013