Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 44, Issue 3, pp 365–374

Interactive Effects of Built Environment and Psychosocial Attributes on Physical Activity: A Test of Ecological Models

  • Ding Ding
  • James F. Sallis
  • Terry L. Conway
  • Brian E. Saelens
  • Lawrence D. Frank
  • Kelli L. Cain
  • Donald J. Slymen
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-012-9394-1

Cite this article as:
Ding, D., Sallis, J.F., Conway, T.L. et al. ann. behav. med. (2012) 44: 365. doi:10.1007/s12160-012-9394-1

Abstract

Background

The principle of cross-level interactions of influence on behavior in ecological models is seldom studied.

Purpose

To examine built environment × psychosocial interactive effects on physical activity.

Methods

Multi-level mixed regression analyses used data from the Neighborhood Quality of Life Study conducted in neighborhoods in two US regions (n = 2,199 adults). Outcomes were (1) objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, (2) reported transport walking, and (3) leisure-walking. Conceptually matched built environment variables were analyzed for domain-specific outcomes.

Results

With leisure walking as the outcome, built environment × psychosocial interactions were significant in 7 of 20 models tested. Directions of interactions were consistent, indicating a stronger built environment–leisure walking association in adults with less favorable psychosocial status. Little evidence supported such interactions with objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity or transport walking as outcomes.

Conclusion

The results imply that the built environment may exert stronger influence on adults who are not psychologically predisposed to be active.

Keywords

Interaction Moderator Psychosocial Physical activity Ecological models 

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ding Ding
    • 1
    • 2
  • James F. Sallis
    • 1
  • Terry L. Conway
    • 1
  • Brian E. Saelens
    • 3
  • Lawrence D. Frank
    • 4
  • Kelli L. Cain
    • 1
  • Donald J. Slymen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Family and Preventive MedicineUniversity of California San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  2. 2.Graduate School of Public HealthSan Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.Children’s Hospital and Regional Medical CenterUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  4. 4.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada