Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 120–126

Clinician-Assessed Depression and HAART Adherence in HIV-Infected Individuals in Methadone Maintenance Treatment

Authors

    • Ferkauf Graduate School of PsychologyYeshiva University
    • Albert Einstein College of MedicineYeshiva University, Rousso Building
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
  • Christina Psaros
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Harvard Medical School
  • Abigail Batchelder
    • Ferkauf Graduate School of PsychologyYeshiva University
  • Allison Applebaum
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
  • Howard Newville
    • Ferkauf Graduate School of PsychologyYeshiva University
  • Steven A. Safren
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
    • Harvard Medical School
Rapid Communication

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-011-9268-y

Cite this article as:
Gonzalez, J.S., Psaros, C., Batchelder, A. et al. ann. behav. med. (2011) 42: 120. doi:10.1007/s12160-011-9268-y

Abstract

Background

The impact of measurement methods on the relationship between depression and HIV treatment adherence has not been adequately examined.

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between clinician- and patient-rated depression and HIV medication adherence.

Methods

The participants were 91 HIV-infected individuals in methadone maintenance. Depression was assessed via clinician ratings (Clinical Global Impression Scale and Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale) and self-report (Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form). Clinicians rated substance abuse using the Clinical Global Impression Scale and a structured interview. HIV medication adherence was measured over the following 2 weeks using electronic caps.

Results

Each unit increase in the Clinical Global Impression Scale was associated with 75% increased odds of nonadherence (OR = 1.75, p = 0.002, 95% CI = 1.23–2.48). Similarly, for each standard deviation Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale increase, there was a 2.6-fold increased odds of nonadherence (OR = 2.60, p = 0.001, 95% CI = 1.45–4.67). Substance abuse and self-reported depression severity were not significantly related to adherence.

Conclusions

Clinician-rated depression severity was a strong predictor of nonadherence. Assessment methods may influence the relationship between depression and HIV nonadherence.

Keywords

HIVDepressionAdherenceAssessmentMethadone maintenanceHAART

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2011