Original Article

Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 91-98

First online:

Efficacy of the Survivor Health and Resilience Education (SHARE) Program to Improve Bone Health Behaviors Among Adolescent Survivors of Childhood Cancer

  • Darren MaysAffiliated withLombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center Email author 
  • , Jessica Donze BlackAffiliated withThe George Washington University
  • , Revonda B. MosherAffiliated withSinai Hospital of Baltimore
  • , Allison HeinlyAffiliated withLombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center
  • , Aziza T. ShadAffiliated withLombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center
  • , Kenneth P. TercyakAffiliated withLombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University Medical Center

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of the Survivor Health and Resilience Education Program intervention—a manualized, behavioral intervention focusing on bone health behaviors among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer.

Methods

Participants were 75 teens aged 11–21 years, one or more years post-treatment, and currently cancer-free. Teens were randomized to a group-based intervention focusing on bone health or a wait-list control. Bone health behaviors were assessed at baseline and 1-month post-intervention.

Results

Controlling for baseline outcome measures and theoretical predictors, milk consumption frequency (p = 0.03), past month calcium supplementation (p < 0.001), days in the past month with calcium supplementation (p < 0.001), and dietary calcium intake (p = 0.04) were significantly greater at 1-month follow-up among intervention participants compared with control participants.

Conclusions

The intervention had a significant short-term impact on self-reported bone health behaviors among adolescent survivors of childhood cancer. Research examining long-term intervention effectiveness is warranted.

Keywords

Cancer Pediatrics Survivors Bone health Behavioral intervention