Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 40, Issue 3, pp 248–257

Association of Depression with Antihypertensive Medication Adherence in Older Adults: Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Findings from CoSMO

Authors

    • Center for Health ResearchOchsner Clinic Foundation
    • Department of EpidemiologyTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
    • Department of Family and Community MedicineTulane University School of Medicine
  • Tareq Islam
    • Department of EpidemiologyTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
  • Paul Muntner
    • Department of EpidemiologyUniversity of Alabama at Birmingham
  • Elizabeth Holt
    • Center for Health ResearchOchsner Clinic Foundation
  • Cara Joyce
    • Department of BiostatisticsTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
  • Donald E. Morisky
    • Department of Community Health SciencesUCLA School of Public Health
  • Larry S. Webber
    • Department of BiostatisticsTulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine
  • Edward D. Frohlich
    • Department of Cardiology-Hypertension SectionOchsner Clinic Foundation
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-010-9217-1

Cite this article as:
Krousel-Wood, M., Islam, T., Muntner, P. et al. ann. behav. med. (2010) 40: 248. doi:10.1007/s12160-010-9217-1

Abstract

Background

Little is known about the associations between depressive symptoms, social support and antihypertensive medication adherence in older adults.

Purpose

We evaluated the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between depressive symptoms, social support and antihypertensive medication adherence in a large cohort of older adults.

Methods

A cohort of 2,180 older adults with hypertension was administered questionnaires, which included the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale, the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Index, and the hypertension-specific Morisky Medication Adherence Scale at baseline and 1 year later.

Results

Overall, 14.1% of participants had low medication adherence, 13.0% had depressive symptoms, and 33.9% had low social support. After multivariable adjustment, the odds ratios that participants with depressive symptoms and low social support would have low medication adherence were 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.43, 2.70) and 1.27 (95% CI 0.98, 1.65), respectively, at baseline and 1.87 (95% CI 1.32, 2.66) and 1.30 (95% CI 0.98, 1.72), respectively, at 1 year follow-up.

Conclusion

Depressive symptoms may be an important modifiable barrier to antihypertensive medication adherence in older adults

Keywords

HypertensionMedication adherenceDepressive symptomsSocial supportMedication possession ratioOlder adults

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2010