Annals of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 37, Issue 1, pp 1–9

Perceived Diabetes Task Competence Mediates the Relationship of both Negative and Positive Affect with Blood Glucose in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

Authors

    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Utah
  • Jorie M. Butler
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Utah
  • Jonathan Butner
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Utah
  • Cynthia A. Berg
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Utah
  • Renn Upchurch
    • Department of PsychologyUniversity of Utah
  • Deborah J. Wiebe
    • Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Texas Dallas Southwestern Medical Center
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12160-009-9086-7

Cite this article as:
Fortenberry, K.T., Butler, J.M., Butner, J. et al. ann. behav. med. (2009) 37: 1. doi:10.1007/s12160-009-9086-7

Abstract

Background

Adolescents dealing with type 1 diabetes experience disruptions in affect and diabetes management that may influence their blood glucose.

Purpose

A daily diary format examined whether daily fluctuations in both negative and positive affect were associated with adolescents’ perceived diabetes task competence (DTC) and blood glucose, and whether perceived DTC mediated the relationship between daily affect and blood glucose.

Methods

Sixty-two adolescents with type 1 diabetes completed a 2-week daily diary, which included daily measures of affect and perceived DTC, then recorded their blood glucose readings at the end of the day. We utilized hierarchical linear modeling to examine whether daily perceived DTC mediated the relationship between daily emotion and blood glucose.

Results

Daily perceived DTC mediated the relationship of both negative and positive affect with daily blood glucose.

Conclusions

This study suggests that within the ongoing process of self-regulation, daily affect may be associated with blood glucose by influencing adolescents’ perception of competence on daily diabetes tasks.

Keywords

AdolescenceDaily affectBlood glucoseDiabetes managementDiary

Copyright information

© The Society of Behavioral Medicine 2009