Neuroethics

, Volume 2, Issue 3, pp 137–149

Brain to Computer Communication: Ethical Perspectives on Interaction Models

Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s12152-009-9040-1

Cite this article as:
Tamburrini, G. Neuroethics (2009) 2: 137. doi:10.1007/s12152-009-9040-1

Abstract

Brain Computer Interfaces (BCIs) enable one to control peripheral ICT and robotic devices by processing brain activity on-line. The potential usefulness of BCI systems, initially demonstrated in rehabilitation medicine, is now being explored in education, entertainment, intensive workflow monitoring, security, and training. Ethical issues arising in connection with these investigations are triaged taking into account technological imminence and pervasiveness of BCI technologies. By focussing on imminent technological developments, ethical reflection is informatively grounded into realistic protocols of brain-to-computer communication. In particular, it is argued that human-machine adaptation and shared control distinctively shape autonomy and responsibility issues in current BCI interaction environments. Novel personhood issues are identified and analyzed too. These notably concern (i) the “sub-personal” use of human beings in BCI-enabled cooperative problem solving, and (ii) the pro-active protection of personal identity which BCI rehabilitation therapies may afford, in the light of so-called motor theories of thinking, for the benefit of patients affected by severe motor disabilities.

Keywords

Brain-computer interfacesBCI communication protocolAutonomyResponsibilityPersonal identity persistenceHuman-machine cooperative problem solvingSub-personal psychology

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dipartimento di Scienze fisicheUniversità di Napoli Federico IINapoliItaly