, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 35-49,
Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.

Neuroimaging and Responsibility Assessments

Abstract

Could neuroimaging evidence help us to assess the degree of a person’s responsibility for a crime which we know that they committed? This essay defends an affirmative answer to this question. A range of standard objections to this high-tech approach to assessing people’s responsibility is considered and then set aside, but I also bring to light and then reject a novel objection—an objection which is only encountered when functional (rather than structural) neuroimaging is used to assess people’s responsibility.