Annals of Nuclear Medicine

, Volume 25, Issue 9, pp 657–666

Radiation exposure and risk–benefit analysis in cancer screening using FDG-PET: results of a Japanese nationwide survey

  • Takeshi Murano
  • Ryogo Minamimoto
  • Michio Senda
  • Kimiichi Uno
  • Seishi Jinnouchi
  • Hiroshi Fukuda
  • Takeshi Iinuma
  • Eriko Tsukamoto
  • Takashi Terauchi
  • Tsuyoshi Yoshida
  • Shinya Oku
  • Sadahiko Nishizawa
  • Kengo Ito
  • Kazuhiro Oguchi
  • Masami Kawamoto
  • Rumi Nakashima
  • Hiroshi Iwata
  • Tomio Inoue
Original article

DOI: 10.1007/s12149-011-0511-1

Cite this article as:
Murano, T., Minamimoto, R., Senda, M. et al. Ann Nucl Med (2011) 25: 657. doi:10.1007/s12149-011-0511-1

Abstract

Objective

The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure and evaluate the risks and benefits of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) in cancer screening.

Methods

A nationwide survey of FDG-PET cancer screening was conducted in 2006, and the results were analyzed with a common index, “extension/shortening of the average life expectancy.”

Results

The average estimated effective dose was 4.4 mSv (male 4.7 mSv; female 4.0 mSv) for dedicated PET and 13.5 mSv (male 14.2 mSv; female 12.8 mSv) for PET/computed tomography (CT). The risk–benefit break-even age from the viewpoint of radiation exposure was in the 40s for men and 30s for women for dedicated PET and in the 50s for men and 50s (variable injection dose) or 60s (constant injection dose) for women for PET/CT.

Conclusions

FDG-PET cancer screening is beneficial for examinees above the break-even ages. The risks and benefits should be explained to examinees because of the larger radiation used in cancer FDG-PET screening compared with other X-ray tests.

Keywords

Cancer screeningPositron emission tomographyRadiation exposureRiskBenefit

Copyright information

© The Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takeshi Murano
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ryogo Minamimoto
    • 3
  • Michio Senda
    • 4
  • Kimiichi Uno
    • 5
  • Seishi Jinnouchi
    • 6
  • Hiroshi Fukuda
    • 7
  • Takeshi Iinuma
    • 8
  • Eriko Tsukamoto
    • 9
  • Takashi Terauchi
    • 1
  • Tsuyoshi Yoshida
    • 10
  • Shinya Oku
    • 11
  • Sadahiko Nishizawa
    • 12
  • Kengo Ito
    • 13
  • Kazuhiro Oguchi
    • 14
  • Masami Kawamoto
    • 15
  • Rumi Nakashima
    • 16
  • Hiroshi Iwata
    • 17
  • Tomio Inoue
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Cancer ScreeningResearch Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer CenterTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of RadiologyYokohama City University Graduate School of MedicineKanagawaJapan
  3. 3.Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of RadiologyNational Center for Global Health and MedicineTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Division of Molecular ImagingInstitute of Biomedical Research and InnovationHyogoJapan
  5. 5.Nishidai ClinicTokyoJapan
  6. 6.Atsuchi Memorial Institute of RadiologyAtsuchi Memorial Clinic PET CenterKagoshimaJapan
  7. 7.Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiology, Institute of Development, Aging and CancerTohoku UniversityMiyagiJapan
  8. 8.National Institute of Radiological SciencesChibaJapan
  9. 9.Medical Cooperation Teishinkai Central CI ClinicHokkaidoJapan
  10. 10.Koga Hospital 21 PET CenterFukuokaJapan
  11. 11.Center for Advanced Information Science and TechnologyThe University of AizuFukushimaJapan
  12. 12.Hamamatsu Medical Imaging CenterHamamatsu Medical Photonics FoundationShizuokaJapan
  13. 13.Center for Development of Advanced Medicine for DementiaNational Center for Geriatrics and GerontologyAichiJapan
  14. 14.Positron Imaging CenterAizawa HospitalNaganoJapan
  15. 15.Yuai ClinicDiagnostic Imaging Center, RadiologyKanagawaJapan
  16. 16.Japanese Red Cross Kumamoto Health Care CenterKumamotoJapan
  17. 17.Nagoya Radiological Diagnosis FoundationAichiJapan