Current Psychology

, Volume 28, Issue 2, pp 85–97

Stress, Sex Differences, and Coping Strategies Among College Students

  • Ruby R. Brougham
  • Christy M. Zail
  • Celeste M. Mendoza
  • Janine R. Miller
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12144-009-9047-0

Cite this article as:
Brougham, R.R., Zail, C.M., Mendoza, C.M. et al. Curr Psychol (2009) 28: 85. doi:10.1007/s12144-009-9047-0

Abstract

The sources of stress (academics, financial, family, social, and daily hassles) and coping strategies (self-help, approach, accommodation, avoidance, and self-punishment) of 166 college students were examined. The relationship between sex, specific sources of stress, and coping strategies was also investigated. Students completed a stress assessment inventory and a stress coping inventory based on a 5-factor revised COPE model (Zuckerman and Gagne Journal of Research in Personality, 37:169–204, 2003). Results found that college women reported a higher overall level of stress and greater use of emotion-focused coping strategies than college men. College men and women also reported different coping strategies for different stressors; however the use of emotion-focused coping strategies dominated over problem-solving strategies for both men and women. These results have implications for designing stress reduction workshops that build on the existing adaptive emotion-focused strategies of college students.

Keywords

StressCopingSex differences

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruby R. Brougham
    • 1
  • Christy M. Zail
    • 1
  • Celeste M. Mendoza
    • 1
  • Janine R. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyChapman UniversityOrangeUSA