Current Psychology

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 252–263

Examining normative pressure in the theory of planned behaviour: Impact of gender and passengers on intentions to break the speed limit

  • Mark Conner
  • Neil Smith
  • Brian McMillan
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12144-003-1020-8

Cite this article as:
Conner, M., Smith, N. & McMillan, B. Curr Psychol (2003) 22: 252. doi:10.1007/s12144-003-1020-8

Abstract

This research examined the impact of passenger-type on young people’s responses to a driving scenario about speeding. In the scenarios, the presence, and gender of the passenger were systematically varied. A total of 162 respondents (83 females, 79 males) completed questionnaires containing measures from the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and additional variables after reading each of two scenarios. The TPB provided good predictions of intention to speed (45% explained variance) with all TPB variables plus moral norms and past behaviour significant. Males compared to females reported significantly greater normative pressure to speed, less control over not speeding, and less moral norms not to speed. Normative pressure was a stronger predictor of intentions for men compared to women when driving alone. Normative pressure was a stronger predictor of intentions when the passenger was male.

Copyright information

© Springer 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark Conner
    • 1
  • Neil Smith
    • 1
  • Brian McMillan
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeedsUK
  2. 2.School of PsychologyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK