Human Rights Review

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 413–429

Bringing Home the Bacon or Not? Globalization and Government Respect for Economic and Social Rights

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12142-009-0128-0

Cite this article as:
Payne, C.L. Hum Rights Rev (2009) 10: 413. doi:10.1007/s12142-009-0128-0

Abstract

The impact of globalization on human rights has generated substantial debate. On the one hand, those making liberal, free-market arguments assert that globalization has a positive impact on developing countries through the increased generation of wealth (e.g., Garrett 1998; Richards et al. in International Studies Quarterly 45:219–239, 2001; Rodrik in Challenge 41:81–94, 1997). On the other hand, the critical perspective claims that globalization negatively impacts respect for human rights because trading arrangements, while open, are detrimentally uneven (e.g., Carleton 1989; Haggard and Maxfield 1996; Stiglitz and Charlton 2005). However, few have looked at the relationship between globalization and respect for economic and social rights. In order to test this relationship, I examine non-OECD countries utilizing two-stage regression analysis to control for investment-selection factors. I find mixed results for the hypothesis that globalization negatively affects respect for economic and social rights. Consistent with Richards et al. (International Studies Quarterly 45:219–239, 2001), I conclude by arguing for the need to disaggregate globalization in order to determine its true effects.

Keywords

Economic and social rightsHuman rightsGlobalizationInternational Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA