Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling

, 5:239

3D tumour models: novel in vitro approaches to cancer studies

Review

DOI: 10.1007/s12079-011-0132-4

Cite this article as:
Nyga, A., Cheema, U. & Loizidou, M. J. Cell Commun. Signal. (2011) 5: 239. doi:10.1007/s12079-011-0132-4

Abstract

3D in vitro models have been used in cancer research as a compromise between 2-dimensional cultures of isolated cancer cells and the manufactured complexity of xenografts of human cancers in immunocompromised animal hosts. 3D models can be tailored to be biomimetic and accurately recapitulate the native in vivo scenario in which they are found. These 3D in vitro models provide an important alternative to both complex in vivo whole organism approaches, and 2D culture with its spatial limitations. Approaches to create more biomimetic 3D models of cancer include, but are not limited to, (i) providing the appropriate matrix components in a 3D configuration found in vivo, (ii) co-culturing cancer cells, endothelial cells and other associated cells in a spatially relevant manner, (iii) monitoring and controlling hypoxia- to mimic levels found in native tumours and (iv) monitoring the release of angiogenic factors by cancer cells in response to hypoxia. This article aims to overview current 3D in vitro models of cancer and review strategies employed by researchers to tackle these aspects with special reference to recent promising developments, as well as the current limitations of 2D cultures and in vivo models. 3D in vitro models provide an important alternative to both complex in vivo whole organism approaches, and 2D culture with its spatial limitations. Here we review current strategies in the field of modelling cancer, with special reference to advances in complex 3D in vitro models.

Keywords

BiomimeticTumour stroma3D cancer modelsIn vitro tumour models

List of abbreviations

2D

Two-dimensional

3D

Three-dimensional

bFGF

Basic fibroblast growth factor

BME

Basement membrane extract

BSA

Bovine serum albumin

DOX

Doxorubicin

EC

Endothelial cell

ECM

Extracellular matrix

EGF

Epidermal growth factor

EHS

Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm

EOC

Human epithelial ovarian cancer

HA

Hyaluronan / hyaluronic acid

IL-8

Interleukin-8

lrECM

Laminin-rich extracellular matrix

MCS

Mesenchymal stem cells

MCTS

Multicellular tumour spheroid

MMP

Metalloproteinase

NOD

Non-obese diabetic

PBS

Phosphate buffered saline

PC

Plastic compression

PGA

Polyglycolide

PEG

Polyethylene glycol

PLA

Polylactide

PLG/PLGA

Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)

PVA

Poly(vinyl alcohol)

RGD

Arginine-glycine-aspartic acid

SCID

Severely compromised immunodeficient

VEGF

Vascular endothelial growth factor

Copyright information

© The International CCN Society 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agata Nyga
    • 1
    • 2
  • Umber Cheema
    • 2
    • 3
  • Marilena Loizidou
    • 1
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Centre for Nanotechnology, Biomaterials and Tissue EngineeringUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  2. 2.UCL Division of Surgery & Interventional ScienceUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  3. 3.Tissue Repair and Engineering Centre, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal ScienceUniversity College LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.UCL Division of Surgery and Interventional ScienceRoyal Free Hospital, 9th floorLondonUK