Indian Journal of Otolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery

, Volume 62, Issue 2, pp 125–130

Role of estimation of arterial blood gases in the management of stridor

Authors

  • M. Panduranga Kamath
    • Department of OtorhinolaryngologyKasturba Medical College
  • Mahesh Chandra Hegde
    • Department of OtorhinolaryngologyKasturba Medical College
  • Suja Sreedharan
    • Department of OtorhinolaryngologyKasturba Medical College
  • Kiran Bhojwani
    • Department of OtorhinolaryngologyKasturba Medical College
  • Vandana Vamadevan
    • Department of OtorhinolaryngologyKasturba Medical College
    • Department of OtorhinolaryngologyKasturba Medical College
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12070-010-0025-5

Cite this article as:
Panduranga Kamath, M., Hegde, M.C., Sreedharan, S. et al. Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg (2010) 62: 125. doi:10.1007/s12070-010-0025-5

Abstract

Aim

We studied the epidemiology and etiology of stridor in our patients along with the role of arterial blood gas (ABG) analysis in their management. We also reviewed their prognostic indices and the clinical outcomes.

Materials and methods

It was a prospective study in a tertiary referral hospital in which 72 patients presenting with stridor, were independently evaluated by 3 different clinicians and clinically classified into mild, moderate and severe. Based on ABG values (pH, PO2, PCO2), we defined 3 groups of patients viz, those in respiratory failure, impending respiratory failure and those with no evidence of failure. Treatment was directed at the cause of stridor. Clinical outcomes were assessed and results classified as resolved, improved, stable and death.

Results

Out of 72 patients, kappa coefficient of agreement between the 3 observers were found to be 0.014, indicating poor interobserver reliability for the working clinical classification. However, ABG analysis indicated otherwise, with 6 patients in respiratory failure, 19 progressing to impending failure. Hence we complied by the more objective ABG analysis in planning management. Laryngomalacia in children and hypopharyngeal malignancies in adults were found to be the most common causes of stridor in our study. As compared to other conditions, laryngomalacia in children had a poorer outcome (p = 0.001).

Conclusion

Early detection of impending respiratory failure was instrumental in achieving better clinical outcomes in our patients presenting with stridor. Thus we inferred that ABG analysis is a valuable tool in the effective management of stridor.

Keywords

StridorBlood gas analysisTracheostomyEndotracheal intubationRespiratory failure
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Copyright information

© Association of Otolaryngologists of India 2010