Tropical Plant Biology

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 28–39

Geographic Influence on Genetic Structure in the Widespread Neotropical Tree Simarouba amara (Simaroubaceae)

Landscape genetic diversity of Simarouba amara
  • Britta Denise Hardesty
  • Christopher W. Dick
  • James L. Hamrick
  • Bernd Degen
  • Stephen P. Hubbell
  • Eldredge Bermingham
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12042-010-9044-3

Cite this article as:
Hardesty, B.D., Dick, C.W., Hamrick, J.L. et al. Tropical Plant Biol. (2010) 3: 28. doi:10.1007/s12042-010-9044-3

Abstract

This study aimed to assess the population genetic structure of a widespread Neotropical tree species, Simarouba amara, at local, regional and continental spatial scales. We used five microsatellite loci to examine genetic variation in 14 natural populations (N = 478 individuals) of this vertebrate-dispersed rain forest tree species in Panama, Ecuador, and French Guiana. Estimates of genetic differentiation (Fst and Rst) were significant among all but one population pair and global differentiation was moderate (Fst = 0.25, Rst = 0.33) with 94% of genetic variation ascribed to differences among three main geographic regions (Central America, Western Ecuador, Amazon basin). There was no evidence of isolation by distance within regions. Allele-size mutations contributed significantly (RST > FST) to the divergences between cis- and trans-Andean populations, highlighting the role of the northern Andean cordilleras as an important geographic barrier for this species.

Keywords

Biogeography Genetic diversity Isolation by distance Microsatellite DNA Neotropics Population structure Tropical tree 

Abbreviations

BCI

Barro Colorado Island

IBD

Isolation by distance

PCR

Polymerase chain reaction

SSR

Simple sequence repeats

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Britta Denise Hardesty
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Christopher W. Dick
    • 2
    • 4
  • James L. Hamrick
    • 3
  • Bernd Degen
    • 5
  • Stephen P. Hubbell
    • 2
    • 3
    • 6
  • Eldredge Bermingham
    • 2
  1. 1.CSIRO Sustainable EcosystemsAthertonAustralia
  2. 2.Smithsonian Tropical Research InstituteBalboaRepublic of Panama
  3. 3.Plant Biology DepartmentUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  4. 4.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and HerbariumUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  5. 5.Johann Heinrich von Thuenen-InstitutInstitute of Forest GeneticsGrosshansdorfGermany
  6. 6.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary BiologyUniversity of California Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA

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