Journal of Molecular Neuroscience

, Volume 50, Issue 2, pp 376–377

Erratum to: NACP-Rep1 relates to Beck Depression Inventory Scores in Healthy Humans

  • Bernd Lenz
  • Christiane Sysk
  • Norbert Thuerauf
  • Marion Clepce
  • Karin Reich
  • Helge Frieling
  • Georg Winterer
  • Stefan Bleich
  • Johannes Kornhuber
Erratum

DOI: 10.1007/s12031-013-9986-7

Cite this article as:
Lenz, B., Sysk, C., Thuerauf, N. et al. J Mol Neurosci (2013) 50: 376. doi:10.1007/s12031-013-9986-7

Erratum to: J Mol Neurosci (2011) 44:4147

DOI 10.1007/s12031-011-9493-7

A reanalysis of the NACP-Rep1 genotypes in our publication "NACP-Rep1 relates to Beck Depression Inventory scores in healthy humans" (Lenz et al. 2011) revealed a deviation from the principles of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE, goodness-of-fit test [χ2], p < 10-30). As reported in literature, several factors might cause violations of HWE. For the NACP-Rep1 polymorphism, a deviation from HWE is not uncommon. In their collaborative analysis, Maraganore et al. (2006) excluded genotype data from 3 of 18 study sites because the NACP-Rep1 genotype frequencies deviated from HWE.

Different reasons might account for the excess of homozygotes in our sample. Keeping in mind that the polymorphism represents a mixed sequence repeat (Xia et al. 1996), fragments with the same length in sequence analysis might represent heterozygous alleles, possibly resulting in an overestimation of homozygous individuals. However, the strong deviation from HWE in our study signaled a genotyping artifact. Therefore, we re-genotyped a subsample of individuals to validate our previous results (new primer pair: forward 5‘-TAT TTT GAC CTT TGT TTT GGC-3‘, reverse 5‘FAM-TTT ATG TAT TTT ATT CCC TGG C-3‘; 0.25 μl forward primer, 0.25 μl reverse primer [each 20 μM], 5 μl HotStarTaq Master Mix [Qiagen, Hilden, Germany], 4 μl H2O and 0.5 μl DNA template; PCR conditions 1 × 95 °C 15 min, 40 × 95 °C 30 s, 50 °C 30 s, 72 °C 30 s, 1 × 72 °C 15 min).

The results revealed initial misgenotyping primarily due to an overestimation of homozygous individuals. We recalculated the previously described statistical analyses using corrected genotype frequencies (Lenz et al. 2011). The corrected genotypes were in HWE (p = 0.12). Both the non-parametric correlation analysis and the linear regression analysis showed significant positive associations between mean NACP-Rep1 and the BDI score (n = 213; Spearman’s ρ = 0.136, p = 0.048; B ± SD, 0.424 ± 0.195, beta = 0.148, T = 2.178, p = 0.031; model summary: R = 0.148, R2 = 0.022, adjusted R2 = 0.017; ANOVA, F = 4.743, p = 0.031). Subsequently, we divided the group into three subgroups according to the additive repeat length (Bönsch et al. 2005). Short: 265/267 (n = 8), 265/269 (n = 3), 267/267 (n = 19); intermediate: 265/271 (n = 3), 267/269 (n = 74), 267/271 (n = 11), 269/269 (n = 75); long: 269/271 (n = 16), 271/271 (n = 4). The subgroups differed significantly in terms of the BDI score (Kruskal-Wallis test; χ2 = 8.096, df = 2, p = 0.017).

In summary, we corrected the previous misgenotyping and also found significant associations between the length of the NACP-Rep1 polymorphism and the BDI score in the corrected data set.

Acknowledgments

We thank Dr. C. Harker Rhodes (Professor of Pathology and Neurology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, New Hampshire, USA) for his assistance.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernd Lenz
    • 1
  • Christiane Sysk
    • 1
  • Norbert Thuerauf
    • 1
  • Marion Clepce
    • 1
  • Karin Reich
    • 1
  • Helge Frieling
    • 1
    • 2
  • Georg Winterer
    • 3
  • Stefan Bleich
    • 1
    • 2
  • Johannes Kornhuber
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and PsychotherapyFriedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-NurembergErlangenGermany
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry, Social Psychiatry and PsychotherapyHannover Medical SchoolHannoverGermany
  3. 3.Cologne Center for Genomics (CCG)University of CologneCologneGermany

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