Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer

, Volume 43, Issue 4, pp 562–569

A Phase II Study of Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Cetuximab with or Without Bevacizumab as Frontline Therapy for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer. A Fox Chase Extramural Research Study

Authors

    • Department of Medical OncologyFox Chase Cancer Center
  • Neal J. Meropol
    • University Hospitals Seidman Cancer CenterCase Western Reserve University
  • Barbara Burtness
    • Department of Medical OncologyFox Chase Cancer Center
  • Crystal S. Denlinger
    • Department of Medical OncologyFox Chase Cancer Center
  • James Lee
    • Hematology Oncology Associates, SJ
  • David Mintzer
    • Pennsylvania Oncology Hematology Associates
  • Fang Zhu
    • Department of Biostatistics and BioinformaticsFox Chase Cancer Center
  • Karen Ruth
    • Department of Biostatistics and BioinformaticsFox Chase Cancer Center
  • Holly Tuttle
    • Extramural Research ProgramFox Chase Cancer Center
  • Judi Sylvester
    • Extramural Research ProgramFox Chase Cancer Center
  • Steven J. Cohen
    • Department of Medical OncologyFox Chase Cancer Center
Original Research

DOI: 10.1007/s12029-012-9368-3

Cite this article as:
Dotan, E., Meropol, N.J., Burtness, B. et al. J Gastrointest Canc (2012) 43: 562. doi:10.1007/s12029-012-9368-3

Abstract

Objectives

Dual inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) demonstrated initial promise in clinical trials. This phase II study tested the efficacy and safety of capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and cetuximab with or without bevacizumab as first-line treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

Methods

Patients were randomized to receive capecitabine 850 mg/m2 PO twice daily for 14 days, oxaliplatin 130 mg/m2 IV day 1, and cetuximab 400 mg/m2 IV loading dose followed by 250 mg/m2 IV days 1, 8, and 15 with (Arm A) or without (Arm B) bevacizumab 7.5 mg/kg IV day 1 every 21 days. Tumor samples were collected and retrospectively analyzed for KRAS mutation status. The primary endpoint was response rate, with time to progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) as secondary objectives.

Results

Twenty-three patients (12 in Arm A, 11 in Arm B) were enrolled onto the study. Median follow-up was 25.9 months. Both treatments were well tolerated, with expected higher rates of grade 1/2 hypertension and bleeding in Arm A. The overall response rate was 54% (36.4% in Arm A and 72.7% in Arm B). Median time to progression was 8.7 months in Arm A and 14.4 months in Arm B. The median survival was 18.0 months in Arm A and 42.5 months in Arm B. The study was prematurely terminated after other studies reported inferior outcomes with dual antibody therapy.

Conclusions

Although terminated early, the study supports the detrimental effect of combining VEGF and EGFR inhibition in metastatic colorectal cancer.

Keywords

Metastatic colon cancerVascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012