Neurocritical Care

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 77–83

Transdermal Nicotine Replacement Therapy in Cigarette Smokers with Acute Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

Authors

    • Department of Critical Care Services, Neuroscience InstituteMaine Medical Center
  • J. Michael Schmidt
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Neeraj Badjatia
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Luis Fernandez
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Fred Rincon
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Jan Claassen
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Errol Gordon
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Emmanuel Carrera
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Pedro Kurtz
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Kiwon Lee
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • E. Sander Connolly
    • Department of Neurological SurgeryColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Stephan A. Mayer
    • Division of Critical Care NeurologyColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
    • Department of Neurological SurgeryColumbia Presbyterian Medical Center
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12028-010-9456-9

Cite this article as:
Seder, D.B., Schmidt, J.M., Badjatia, N. et al. Neurocrit Care (2011) 14: 77. doi:10.1007/s12028-010-9456-9

Abstract

Background

We evaluated the safety of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in active smokers with acute (aneurysmal) subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH).

Methods

A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted in a prospectively collected database including all SAH patients admitted to an 18-bed neuro-ICU between January 1, 2001 and October 1, 2007. Univariate and multivariable models were constructed, employing stepwise logistic regression. The primary endpoint was 3-month mortality. Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) due to vasospasm, angiographic and TCD evidence of vasospasm, and delirium were secondary endpoints.

Results

Active cigarette smokers admitted with SAH included 128 that received NRT and 106 that did not. Patients were well-matched for age, admission Hunt-Hess Grade, radiographic findings, and APACHE II scores, but those who received NRT were more likely to be heavy smokers (>10 cigarettes daily), diabetic, heavy alcohol users, and to have cerebral edema on admission. NRT was associated in multivariate analysis with a lower risk of death at 3 months (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.04–0.37, P < 0.001). There were no differences in the frequency of DCI and most other medical complications, but delirium (19 vs. 9%, P = 0.006) and seizures (9 vs. 2%, P = 0.024) were more common in patients who received NRT.

Conclusions

Despite vasoactive properties, administration of NRT among active smokers with acute SAH appeared to be safe, with similar rates of vasospasm and DCI, and a slightly higher rate of seizures. The association of NRT with lower mortality could be due to chance, to uncontrolled factors, or to a neuroprotective effect of nicotine in active smokers hospitalized with SAH, and should be tested prospectively.

Keywords

Subarachnoid hemorrhageHemorrhagic strokeNicotineNeurocritical careAneurysm

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010