Neurocritical Care

, Volume 7, Issue 1, pp 76–80

Multifocal and Recurrent Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Due to an Herbal Supplement Containing Natural Coumarins

Authors

    • Department of Surgery, Neuroscience and Experimental TherapeuticsTexas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine
    • Texas Brain and Spine InstituteTAMHSC College of Medicine
  • Stacy A. Taylor
    • Department of PharmacySt. Joseph Regional Health Center
  • Wayne McDermott
    • Department of Critical Care Pharmacy ServicesSt Joseph Regional Health Center
  • Puya Alikhani
    • Texas A and M Health Science Center College of Medicine
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s12028-007-0075-z

Cite this article as:
Friedman, J.A., Taylor, S.A., McDermott, W. et al. Neurocrit Care (2007) 7: 76. doi:10.1007/s12028-007-0075-z

Abstract

Introduction

Over-the-counter herbal and alternative medicines are classified as dietary supplements and, unlike drugs, are not rigorously regulated by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Their potential adverse effects are often poorly characterized.

Method

Red clover, dong quai, and Siberian ginseng are herbal compounds used for treatment of perimenopausal symptoms such as hot flashes. These compounds are known to contain coumarins, and thus carry the potential for hemorrhagic complications; however, no cases of intracranial hemorrhage have been reported.

Discussion

We report a 53-year-old woman with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the use of an herbal supplement containing red clover, dong quai, and Siberian ginseng.

Keywords

Subarachnoid hemorrhageRed cloverDong quaiSiberian ginsengNatural coumarins

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2007