Immunologic Research

, Volume 59, Issue 1, pp 109–117

The CD4 T cell response to respiratory syncytial virus infection

  • Allison F. Christiaansen
  • Cory J. Knudson
  • Kayla A. Weiss
  • Steven M. Varga
IMMUNOLOGY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA

DOI: 10.1007/s12026-014-8540-1

Cite this article as:
Christiaansen, A.F., Knudson, C.J., Weiss, K.A. et al. Immunol Res (2014) 59: 109. doi:10.1007/s12026-014-8540-1

Abstract

Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can induce severe lower respiratory tract infections in infants and is the leading cause of bronchiolitis in children worldwide. RSV-induced inflammation is believed to contribute substantially to the severity of disease. T helper (Th)2-, Th9-, and Th17-related cytokines are all observed in infants hospitalized following a severe RSV infection. These cytokines cause an influx of inflammatory cells, resulting in mucus production and reduced lung function. Consistent with the data from RSV-infected infants, CD4 T cell production of Interleukin (IL)-9, IL-13, and IL-17 has all been shown to contribute to RSV-induced disease in a murine model of RSV infection. Conversely, murine studies indicate that the combined actions of regulatory factors such as CD4 regulatory T cells and IL-10 inhibit the inflammatory cytokine response and limit RSV-induced disease. In support of this, IL-10 polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to severe disease in infants. Insufficient regulation and excess inflammation not only impact disease following primary RSV infection it can also have a major impact following vaccination. Prior immunization with a formalin-inactivated (FI-RSV) vaccine resulted in enhanced disease in infants following a natural RSV infection. A Th2 CD4 T cell response has been implicated to be a major contributor in mediating vaccine-enhanced disease. Thus, future RSV vaccines must induce a balanced CD4 T cell response in order to facilitate viral clearance while inducing proper regulation of the immune response.

Keywords

RSV CD4 T cell Th2 Treg IL-10 Vaccine 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allison F. Christiaansen
    • 1
  • Cory J. Knudson
    • 2
  • Kayla A. Weiss
    • 2
  • Steven M. Varga
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA
  2. 2.Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in ImmunologyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA