Immunologic Research

, Volume 49, Issue 1, pp 44–48

The long and the short of telomeres in bone marrow recipient SCID patients

  • Marcella Sarzotti-Kelsoe
  • Xiaoju G. Daniell
  • John F. Whitesides
  • Rebecca H. Buckley
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12026-010-8192-8

Cite this article as:
Sarzotti-Kelsoe, M., Daniell, X.G., Whitesides, J.F. et al. Immunol Res (2011) 49: 44. doi:10.1007/s12026-010-8192-8

Abstract

Telomeres are noncoding DNA regions at the end of the chromosomes that are crucial for genome stability. Since telomere length decreases with cell division, they can be used as a signature of cell proliferation history. T-cell reconstitution in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) subjects, recipients of T-cell-depleted, allogeneic-related bone marrow cells, is due to the development and maturation of donor T-cell precursors in the infant’s vestigial thymus and to homeostatic proliferation of mature T cells in the peripheral organs. Since T-cell function, thymic output, and T-cell clonal diversity are maintained long term in these patients, we investigated whether donor T-cell engraftment resulted in increased telomere shortening. Our study of seven SCID patients, following successful bone marrow transplantation, demonstrates that the patients’ peripheral T cells did not exhibit greater than normal telomere shortening.

Keywords

SCIDTelomereTransplantationT cellTREC

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcella Sarzotti-Kelsoe
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoju G. Daniell
    • 2
  • John F. Whitesides
    • 3
  • Rebecca H. Buckley
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of ImmunologyDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA
  4. 4.Department of PediatricsDuke University Medical CenterDurhamUSA