NeuroMolecular Medicine

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 338–348

Methylglyoxal Induces Tau Hyperphosphorylation via Promoting AGEs Formation

  • Xiao-Hong Li
  • Jia-Zhao Xie
  • Xia Jiang
  • Bing-Ling Lv
  • Xiang-Shu Cheng
  • Lai-Ling Du
  • Jia-Yu Zhang
  • Jian-Zhi Wang
  • Xin-Wen Zhou
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s12017-012-8191-0

Cite this article as:
Li, XH., Xie, JZ., Jiang, X. et al. Neuromol Med (2012) 14: 338. doi:10.1007/s12017-012-8191-0

Abstract

The hyperphosphorylated tau is a major protein component of neurofibrillary tangle, which is one of hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While the level of methylglyoxal (MG) is significantly increased in the AD brains, the role of MG in tau phosphorylation is still not reported. Here, we found that MG could induce tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related sites in neuroblastoma 2a cells under maintaining normal cell viability. MG treatment increased the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and p38 MAPK were activated, whereas the level and activity of JNK, Erk1/2, cdk5, and PP2A were not altered after MG treatment. Simultaneous inhibition of GSK-3β or p38 attenuated the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Aminoguanidine, a blocker of AGEs formation, could effectively reverse the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. These data suggest that MG induces AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation through AGEs formation involving RAGE up-regulation and GSK-3β activation and p38 activation is also partially involved in MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Thus, targeting MG may be a promising therapeutic strategy to prevent AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation.

Keywords

MethylglyoxalTauHyperphosphorylationAGEsRAGEGSK-3β

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiao-Hong Li
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jia-Zhao Xie
    • 1
  • Xia Jiang
    • 1
  • Bing-Ling Lv
    • 1
  • Xiang-Shu Cheng
    • 1
  • Lai-Ling Du
    • 1
  • Jia-Yu Zhang
    • 1
  • Jian-Zhi Wang
    • 1
  • Xin-Wen Zhou
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Neurological Diseases of Education Committee of ChinaTongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina
  2. 2.Institute of Traumatic Brain Injury and NeurologyPingjin Hospital, Logistics College of Chinese People’s Armed Police ForcesTianjinChina