Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 148–155

Mold and Human Health: Separating the Wheat from the Chaff

Authors

  • H. David Pettigrew
    • Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical ImmunologyUniversity of California at Davis School of Medicine, Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility
  • Carlo F. Selmi
    • Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical ImmunologyUniversity of California at Davis School of Medicine, Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility
    • Department of Translational Medicine, IRCCS-Istituto Clinico HumanitasUniversità degli Studi di Milano
  • Suzanne S. Teuber
    • Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical ImmunologyUniversity of California at Davis School of Medicine, Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility
    • Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical ImmunologyUniversity of California at Davis School of Medicine, Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12016-009-8175-5

Cite this article as:
Pettigrew, H.D., Selmi, C.F., Teuber, S.S. et al. Clinic Rev Allerg Immunol (2010) 38: 148. doi:10.1007/s12016-009-8175-5

Abstract

The term “mold” is utilized to define the ubiquitous fungal species commonly found in household dust and observed as visible multicellular filaments. Several well-defined human diseases are known to be caused or exacerbated by mold or by exposure to their byproducts. Among these, a solid connection has been established with infections, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and asthma. In the past decades, other less-defined and generally false conditions have also been ascribed to mold. We will herein review and critically discuss the available evidence on the influence of mold on human health.

Keywords

MoldHuman diseasesFungi kingdom

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2009