Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 201–269

Evidence for the Use of Intravenous Immunoglobulins—A Review of the Literature

  • Shaye Kivity
  • Uriel Katz
  • Natalie Daniel
  • Udi Nussinovitch
  • Neophytos Papageorgiou
  • Yehuda Shoenfeld
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12016-009-8155-9

Cite this article as:
Kivity, S., Katz, U., Daniel, N. et al. Clinic Rev Allerg Immunol (2010) 38: 201. doi:10.1007/s12016-009-8155-9

Abstract

Intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) were first introduced in the middle of the twentieth century for the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. In 1981, Paul Imbach noticed an improvement of immune-mediated thrombocytopenia, in patients receiving IVIg for immunodeficiencies. This opened a new era for the treatment of autoimmune conditions with IVIg. Since then, IVIg has become an important treatment option in a wide spectrum of diseases, including autoimmune and acute inflammatory conditions, most of them off-label (not included in the US Food and Drug Administration recommendation). A panel of immunologists and internists with experience in IVIg therapy reviewed the medical literature for published data concerning treatment with IVIg. The quality of evidence was assessed, and a summary of the available relevant literature in each disease was given. To our knowledge, this is the first all-inclusive comprehensive review, developed to assist the clinician when considering the use of IVIg in autoimmune diseases, immune deficiencies, and other conditions.

Keywords

Intravenous immunoglobulinsIntravenous gamma globulinsAutoimmunityEvidenceIVIgIgIV

Abbreviations

y/o

year old

IVIg

intravenous immunoglobulins

RCT

randomized controlled trial

IFN

interferon

CS

corticosteroids

BMT

bone marrow transplantation

HCV

hepatitis C virus

PD

prednisone

CP

cyclophosphamide

CNS

central nervous system

MPGN

membranous-proliferative glomerulonephritis

MP

methylprednisolone

PP

plasmapheresis

LMWH

low-molecular-weight heparin

LDA

low-dose aspirin

NYHA

New York Heart Association

EF

ejection fraction

CHF

congestive heart failure

DCM

dilated cardiomyopathy

PPCM

peripartum cardiomyopathy

CIP

chronic idiopathic pericarditis

NLE

neonatal lupus erythematosus

MMP

mucous membrane pemphigoid

EDSS

expanded disability status scale

VLCFA

very-long-chain fatty acids

GTOE

glycerol trioleate/erucic supplementation

INCAT

inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment disability score

MCV

motor conduction velocities

CMAP

compound muscle action potential

MRC scale

medical research council

RRMS

relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis

Ref

reference

MTX

methotrexate

MMF

mycophenolate mofetil

CAA

coronary artery aneurysm

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shaye Kivity
    • 1
    • 2
  • Uriel Katz
    • 1
    • 3
  • Natalie Daniel
    • 4
  • Udi Nussinovitch
    • 5
  • Neophytos Papageorgiou
    • 5
  • Yehuda Shoenfeld
    • 1
    • 3
    • 5
    • 6
    • 7
  1. 1.Center for Autoimmune DiseasesSheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Medicine ‘A and C’Sheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael
  3. 3.Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  4. 4.Allergy and Clinical Immunology ClinicKupat Holim MeuhedetIsrael
  5. 5.Department of Medicine ‘B’, Sheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael
  6. 6.Incumbent of the Laura Schwarz-Kip Chair for Research of Autoimmune DiseasesTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  7. 7.Department of Medicine ‘B’ and Center for Autoimmune DiseasesChaim Sheba Medical CenterTel HashomerIsrael