Stem Cell Reviews and Reports

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 703–713

Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Lines from Friedreich Ataxia Patients

  • Jun Liu
  • Paul J. Verma
  • Marguerite V. Evans-Galea
  • Martin B. Delatycki
  • Anna Michalska
  • Jessie Leung
  • Duncan Crombie
  • Joseph P. Sarsero
  • Robert Williamson
  • Mirella Dottori
  • Alice Pébay
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12015-010-9210-x

Cite this article as:
Liu, J., Verma, P.J., Evans-Galea, M.V. et al. Stem Cell Rev and Rep (2011) 7: 703. doi:10.1007/s12015-010-9210-x

Abstract

Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by neurodegeneration and cardiomyopathy. It is caused by a trinucleotide (GAA) repeat expansion in the first intron of the FXN gene that results in reduced synthesis of FXN mRNA and its protein product, frataxin. We report the generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell lines derived from skin fibroblasts from two FRDA patients. Each of the patient-derived iPS (FA-iPS) cell lines maintain the GAA repeat expansion and the reduced FXN mRNA expression that are characteristic of the patient. The FA-iPS cells are pluripotent and form teratomas when injected into nude mice. We demonstrate that following in vitro differentiation the FA-iPS cells give rise to the two cell types primarily affected in FRDA, peripheral neurons and cardiomyocytes. The FA-iPS cell lines have the potential to provide valuable models to study the cellular pathology of FRDA and to develop high-throughput drug screening assays. We have previously demonstrated that stable insertion of a functional human BAC containing the intact FXN gene into stem cells results in the expression of frataxin protein in differentiated neurons. As such, iPS cell lines derived from FRDA patients, following correction of the mutated gene, could provide a useful source of immunocompatible cells for transplantation therapy.

Keywords

Induced pluripotent stem cells Friedreich ataxia Frataxin 

Supplementary material

12015_2010_9210_Fig7_ESM.gif (115 kb)
Supplementary Figure 1

Endogenous and exogenous expression of transgenes in iPS cell lines and fibroblasts. a RT-PCR showed that generated FA3-iPS cells and FA4-iPS cells expressed endogenous human pluripotent markers: OCT-4, SOX2, NANOG, and REX1. Transgene OCT-4 and SOX2 were effectively silenced, while the KLF4 and cMYC transgenes were still expressed. (Endo = endogenous genes, Tg = transgenes). b Integration of four transcription factors OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and cMYC transgenes in the genome of generated iPS cells was confirmed by genomic PCR using transgene-specific primers, with parental fibroblasts as negative controls, and respective encoding constructs as positive controls. (GIF 114 kb)

12015_2010_9210_MOESM1_ESM.tif (1.7 mb)
High resolution image (TIFF 1734 kb)
12015_2010_9210_Fig8_ESM.gif (297 kb)
Supplementary Figure 2

FRDA-iPS cells form teratomas. Histology of teratoma with gut-like epithelium (a, d), cartilage (b, e) and neural rosettes (c, f) after injection of FA3-iPS cells (a–c) and FA4-iPS cells (d–e) into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. (GIF 296 kb)

12015_2010_9210_MOESM2_ESM.tif (593 kb)
High resolution image (TIFF 592 kb)
12015_2010_9210_Fig9_ESM.gif (245 kb)
Supplementary Figure 3

FRDA-iPS cells form EB with cells representative of the three germ layers. Immunostaining of EBs generated from FA3-iPS and FA4-iPS cells immunostained with markers for endoderm (AFP, a), mesoderm (c-kit or CD31, b) and ectoderm (nestin, c). (d): Isotype controls. (GIF 244 kb)

12015_2010_9210_MOESM3_ESM.tif (2.6 mb)
High resolution image (TIFF 2667 kb)
12015_2010_9210_Fig10_ESM.gif (194 kb)
Supplementary Figure 4

GAA expansion PCR for FA3- and FA4-iPS cells. The size of the GAA expansion was determined in control (FAC4) and FRDA (FA3 and FA4) cells by comparison to standard DNA markers (M1 and M2). Genomic DNA isolated from fibroblasts (lanes 1,3 and 6) and iPS cells (lanes 2, 4, 5 and 7–9) were used in long range PCR of the first intron of FXN. Non-expanded alleles yield a product of 810 bp. Positive (BACRP11-265B8 DNA containing the FXN gene; lane C) and negative controls (no DNA; lane N) were included. Multiple bands are observed in each sample since multiple sub-clones were pooled. (GIF 194 kb)

12015_2010_9210_MOESM4_ESM.tif (576 kb)
High resolution image (TIFF 576 kb)
Supplementary Movie 1

FRDA-iPS cells generate beating cardiomyocytes. Generation of functional cardiomyocytes obtained following FA3-iPS derived EB plated onto gelatine and spontaneous differentiation. (MPG 8895 kb)

Supplementary Movie 2

FRDA-iPS cells generate beating cardiomyocytes. Generation of functional cardiomyocytes obtained following FA4-iPS derived EB plated onto gelatine and spontaneous differentiation. (MPG 6509 kb)

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jun Liu
    • 1
  • Paul J. Verma
    • 1
  • Marguerite V. Evans-Galea
    • 2
  • Martin B. Delatycki
    • 2
    • 3
  • Anna Michalska
    • 4
  • Jessie Leung
    • 5
  • Duncan Crombie
    • 6
  • Joseph P. Sarsero
    • 2
  • Robert Williamson
    • 7
  • Mirella Dottori
    • 5
    • 8
  • Alice Pébay
    • 5
    • 6
    • 8
  1. 1.Centre for Reproduction and Development, Monash Institute of Medical Research, Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Bruce Lefroy Centre for Genetic Health ResearchMurdoch Childrens Research InstituteParkvilleAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Clinical GeneticsAustin HealthHeidelbergAustralia
  4. 4.Monash Immunology and Stem Cell LaboratoriesMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia
  5. 5.Centre for NeuroscienceThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  6. 6.O’ Brien InstituteFitzroyAustralia
  7. 7.Department of PaediatricsThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  8. 8.Department of PharmacologyThe University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

Personalised recommendations