Stem Cell Reviews

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 283–292

Role of Gap Junctions in Embryonic and Somatic Stem Cells

  • Raymond C. B. Wong
  • Martin F. Pera
  • Alice Pébay
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12015-008-9038-9

Cite this article as:
Wong, R.C.B., Pera, M.F. & Pébay, A. Stem Cell Rev (2008) 4: 283. doi:10.1007/s12015-008-9038-9

Abstract

Stem cells provide an invaluable tool to develop cell replacement therapies for a range of serious disorders caused by cell damage or degeneration. Much research in the field is focused on the identification of signals that either maintain stem cell pluripotency or direct their differentiation. Understanding how stem cells communicate within their microenvironment is essential to achieve their therapeutic potentials. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been described in embryonic stem cells (ES cells) and various somatic stem cells. GJIC has been implicated in regulating different biological events in many stem cells, including cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. This review summarizes the current understanding of gap junctions in both embryonic and somatic stem cells, as well as their potential role in growth control and cellular differentiation.

Keywords

Somatic stem cellsNeural stem cellsHematopoietic stem cellsMesenchymal stem cellsEmbryonic stem cellsGap junctionsGap junctional intercellular communication

Abbreviations

α-GA

α-glycyrrhetinic acid

BMP

Bone morphogenetic protein

ES cells

Embryonic stem cells

HSC

Hematopoietic stem cells

MSC

Mesenchymal stem cells

GJIC

Gap junctional intercellular communication

hESC

Human embryonic stem cells

mESC

Mouse embryonic stem cells

PDGF

Platelet-derived growth factor

S1P

Sphingosine-1-phosphate

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond C. B. Wong
    • 1
  • Martin F. Pera
    • 2
  • Alice Pébay
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Biological ChemistryUniversity of California IrvineIrvineUSA
  2. 2.Eli and Edythe Broad Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research, Keck School of MedicineUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Centre for Neuroscience and Department of PharmacologyThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia