Stem Cell Reviews

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 249–255

Stem Cells and Cancer: An Overview

Authors

  • Kevin M. Sales
    • Biomaterials & Tissue Engineering Centre, Academic Division of Surgical and Interventional SciencesUniversity College London
  • Marc C. Winslet
    • Biomaterials & Tissue Engineering Centre, Academic Division of Surgical and Interventional SciencesUniversity College London
    • Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust Hospital
    • Biomaterials & Tissue Engineering Centre, Academic Division of Surgical and Interventional SciencesUniversity College London
    • Nanotechnology & Tissue Repair in SurgeryUniversity College London
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s12015-007-9002-0

Cite this article as:
Sales, K.M., Winslet, M.C. & Seifalian, A.M. Stem Cell Rev (2007) 3: 249. doi:10.1007/s12015-007-9002-0

Abstract

Definite evidence of the importance of cancer stem cells in the progression of cancer has now come to light. Key markers of these cells have been identified in many solid tumours as well as leukaemias. Specific studies modelling the tumour induction of specific cells isolated by surface antigens such as CD44 have demonstrated that these cells are not only present in tumours but that they are the key units in their tumourgenecity. These findings provide useful insight for disease progression, treatment and metastasis. The wide variety of proposed markers, and their similarity to endothelial progenitor cells found in angiogenesis, complicates these studies. Definite proof falls only in the induction of tumours in vivo. Here we review the developments in cancer stem cells and the markers that have been found for these cells.

Keywords

CancerStem cellsTumour

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2007