, Volume 133, Issue 2, pp 162-170

The Role of Calcium, Magnesium, and Zinc in Pre-Eclampsia

Rent the article at a discount

Rent now

* Final gross prices may vary according to local VAT.

Get Access

Abstract

Pre-eclampsia is the most common medical complication of pregnancy associated with increased maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. Its exact etiology is not known, although several evidences indicate that various elements might play an important role in pre-eclampsia. This study was carried out to analyze and to compare the concentration of calcium, magnesium, and zinc in the serum of women with pre-eclampsia and in normal pregnant women. Fifty clinically diagnosed patients with pre-eclampsia (25 with mild and 25 with severe pre-eclampsia) and 50 normal pregnant controls were enrolled in this study. The serum calcium, magnesium, and zinc levels were estimated with an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The mean serum levels of calcium, magnesium, and zinc in normal pregnant group were 2.45 ± 0.18 mmol/L, 0.79 ± 0.13 mmol/L, and 15.64 ± 2.4 µmol/L, respectively, while in mild pre-eclamptic group, these were 2.12 ± 0.15 mmol/L, 0.67 ± 0.14 mmol/L, and 12.72 ± 1.7 µmol/L, respectively. Serum levels in severe pre-eclamptic group were 1.94 ± 0.09 mmol/L, 0.62 ± 0.11 mmol/L, and 12.04 ± 1.4 µmol/L, respectively. These results indicate that reduction in serum levels of calcium, magnesium, and zinc during pregnancy might be possible contributors in etiology of pre-eclampsia, and supplementation of these elements to diet may be of value to prevent pre-eclampsia.