, Volume 471, Issue 5, pp 1533-1538
Date: 06 Feb 2013

What Are the Causes of Revision Total Knee Arthroplasty in Japan?

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Topic
Knee

Abstract

Background

There is limited information regarding the cause of revision TKA in Asia, especially Japan. Owing to differences in patient backgrounds and lifestyles, the modes of TKA failures in Asia may differ from those in Western countries.

Questions/purposes

We therefore determined (1) causes of revision TKA in a cohort of Japanese patients with revision TKA and (2) whether patient demographic features and underlying diagnosis of primary TKA are associated with the causes of revision TKA.

Methods

We assessed all revision TKA procedures performed at five major centers in Hokkaido from 2006 to 2011 for the causes of failures. Demographic data and underlying diagnosis for index primary TKA of the revision cases were compared to those of randomly selected primary TKAs during the same period.

Results

One hundred forty revision TKAs and 4047 primary TKAs were performed at the five centers, indicating a revision burden of 3.3%. The most common cause of revision TKA was mechanical loosening (40%) followed by infection (24%), wear/osteolysis (9%), instability (9%), implant failure (6%), periprosthetic fracture (4%), and other reasons (8%). The mean age of patients with periprosthetic fracture was older (77 versus 72 years) and the male proportion in patients with infection was higher (33% versus 19%) than those of patients in the primary TKA group. There was no difference in BMI between primary TKAs and any type of revision TKA except other causes.

Conclusions

The revision burden at the five referral centers in Hokkaido was 3.3%, and the most common cause of revision TKA was mechanical loosening followed by infection. Demographic data such as age and sex might be associated with particular causes of revision TKA.

The institution of one or more of the authors (TM) has received, during the study period, funding from DePuy, A Johnson & Johnson Company (Warsaw, IN, USA) and Smith & Nephew, Inc (Memphis, TN, USA). One of the authors (TM) certifies that he has or may receive payments or benefits, during the study period, an amount of $10,000 to $100,000, from Robert Reid Inc (Tokyo, Japan).
All ICMJE Conflict of Interest Forms for authors and Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research editors and board members are on file with the publication and can be viewed on request.
Each author certifies that his or her institutional review board approved the human protocol for this investigation and that all investigations were conducted in conformity with ethical principles of research.
This work was performed at Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Kita-Ku, Sapporo, Japan.