, Volume 471, Issue 3, pp 981-988
Date: 05 Dec 2012

Physical Activity Level Improves After Periacetabular Osteotomy for the Treatment of Symptomatic Hip Dysplasia

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Topic
Hip

Abstract

Background

Hip pain secondary to acetabular dysplasia can prevent participation in recreational activities.

Questions/Purposes

We retrospectively evaluated the physical activity level and pain after periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) for the treatment of symptomatic hip dysplasia.

Methods

Forty-seven female and four male patients with a mean age of 27 years underwent a PAO. Physical activity (UCLA) and pain (WOMAC) were assessed preoperatively, at 1 year, and at minimum 2 years postoperatively. Multivariable linear regression identified substantial, independent factors associated with postoperative activity level.

Results

The UCLA activity scores were on average higher at 1 year and remained higher at minimum 2 years when compared with preoperative scores. Mean postoperative WOMAC pain scores assessed at 1 year and at least 2 years were lower than mean preoperative scores. Age and preoperative physical activity level were strong independent predictors for activity level at 1 year and at minimum 2 years after surgery. Postoperative pain level was a moderate predictor for the level of activity at minimum 2-year followup.

Conclusions

Physical activity level improves after PAO. Younger age and higher activity levels before surgery and lower level of pain after surgery are predictive factors for postoperative level of activity in the short term. The data presented here may be useful to counsel the active young adult with symptomatic hip dysplasia about the improvement of level of activity to be expected after PAO.

Level of Evidence

Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Each author certifies that he or she, or a member of his or her immediate family, has no funding or commercial associations (eg, consultancies, stock ownership, equity interest, patent/licensing arrangements, etc) that might pose a conflict of interest in connection with the submitted article.
All ICMJE Conflict of Interest Forms for authors and Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research editors and board members are on file with the publication and can be viewed on request.
This work was performed at Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA, USA.