Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®

, Volume 469, Issue 5, pp 1302–1307

Correlation of Spine Deformity, Lung Function, and Seat Pressure in Spina Bifida

  • Jayesh Patel
  • Janet L. Walker
  • Vishwas R. Talwalkar
  • Henry J. Iwinski
  • Todd A. Milbrandt
Symposium: Myelomeningocele

DOI: 10.1007/s11999-010-1687-8

Cite this article as:
Patel, J., Walker, J.L., Talwalkar, V.R. et al. Clin Orthop Relat Res (2011) 469: 1302. doi:10.1007/s11999-010-1687-8
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Abstract

Background

Spinal deformity, a common problem in children with myelodysplasia, is associated with alterations in pulmonary function and sitting balance. Sitting imbalance causes areas of high pressure in patients already at high risk for developing pressure ulcers due to insensate skin.

Questions/purposes

We asked: Does spinal deformity affect pulmonary function tests in children with myelodysplasia? Does the magnitude of spinal curvatures and pelvic obliquity affect seating pressures? Does spinal deformity and seated pressures correlate with a history of pressure ulcers?

Patients and Methods

We retrospectively reviewed 32 patients with myelodysplasia and scoliosis (mean age, 14 years). The mean thoracic scoliosis was 64° with a mean pelvic obliquity of 15°. The mean forced vital capacity was 59% of predicted. The mean of the average and peak seated pressures were 24 and 137 mm Hg, respectively. We examined spinal radiographs, pulmonary function tests, and seated pressure maps and evaluated correlations of spinal deformity measures, pulmonary function, and seated pressures.

Results

The thoracic scoliosis inversely correlated with lung volume and weakly related with only the forced midexpiratory volume parameter (R2 = 31%). The curve magnitude was associated with % seated area with pressures of 38 to 70 mm Hg while lesser degrees of pelvic obliquity were associated with % seating area with pressures of less than 38 mm Hg (R2 = 25% and 24%, respectively). A history of pressure ulcers did not correlate with any spinal deformity or seated pressure measures.

Conclusions

All patients displayed a reduced forced vital capacity, but this reduction was not related to increasing scoliosis. The smaller scoliosis curves and lesser degrees of pelvic obliquity were associated with larger areas of low seated pressures.

Copyright information

© The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons® 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jayesh Patel
    • 1
  • Janet L. Walker
    • 1
    • 2
  • Vishwas R. Talwalkar
    • 1
    • 2
  • Henry J. Iwinski
    • 1
    • 2
  • Todd A. Milbrandt
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  2. 2.Shriners Hospital for Children–LexingtonLexingtonUSA