Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®

, Volume 467, Issue 6, pp 1493–1500

Reversing Muscle and Mobility Deficits 1 to 4 Years after TKA: A Pilot Study

  • Paul C. LaStayo
  • Whitney Meier
  • Robin L. Marcus
  • Ryan Mizner
  • Lee Dibble
  • Christopher Peters
Symposium: Advanced Techniques for Rehabilitation after Total Hip and Knee Arthroplasty

DOI: 10.1007/s11999-009-0801-2

Cite this article as:
LaStayo, P.C., Meier, W., Marcus, R.L. et al. Clin Orthop Relat Res (2009) 467: 1493. doi:10.1007/s11999-009-0801-2

Abstract

Muscle and mobility deficits can persist for years after a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The purposes of this study were (1) to determine if 12 weeks of rehabilitation with resistance exercise induces increases in muscle size, strength, and mobility in individuals 1 to 4 years after a TKA; and (2) to compare the muscle and mobility outcomes of a traditional resistance exercise rehabilitation program with a rehabilitation program focused on eccentric resistance exercise. Seventeen individuals (13 women, four men; mean age, 68 years; age range, 55–80 years) with either a unilateral or bilateral TKA (total of 24 knees) were included in this matched and randomized repeated-measures rehabilitation pilot trial. Increases in quadriceps muscle volume and knee extension strength followed 12 weeks of eccentric exercise. Improvements were also noted in four mobility tests. Similar improvements were noted in the traditional group in two mobility tests. An increase in muscle size and strength and an improvement in levels of mobility can occur after 12 weeks of resistance exercise in older individuals 1 to 4 years after TKA. When the exercise mode focuses on eccentric resistance, the muscle growth response is greater as is the improvement in important mobility tasks.

Level of Evidence: Level II, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Copyright information

© The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul C. LaStayo
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Whitney Meier
    • 1
    • 3
  • Robin L. Marcus
    • 1
    • 3
  • Ryan Mizner
    • 4
  • Lee Dibble
    • 1
    • 3
  • Christopher Peters
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Physical TherapyUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  2. 2.Department of Exercise and Sport SciencesUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  3. 3.Department of OrthopedicsUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  4. 4.Department of Physical TherapyEastern Washington UniversityCheneyUSA