, Volume 467, Issue 3, pp 717-723
Date: 10 Dec 2008

Femoroacetabular Impingement: Do Outcomes Reliably Improve with Surgical Dislocations?

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Abstract

Femoroacetabular impingement is a motion-based concept of conflict that occurs secondary to morphologic abnormalities of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Creating impingement-free motion through restoration of normal morphology serves as the goal of joint-preserving procedures. We retrospectively reviewed the short-term functional and radiographic outcomes of 46 patients (48 hips) with femoroacetabular impingement treated with a surgical dislocation and restoration of offset. The average Merle D’Aubigné-Postel score improved from a preoperative of 13 (range, 7–16 ± 1.7) to a postoperative score of 16.8 (range, 12–18 ± 1.3). Creating impingement-free motion via a surgical dislocation improves symptoms in patients with limited radiographic signs of arthritis who are experiencing impingement-related hip pain.

Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Each author certifies that he or she has no commercial associations (eg, consultancies, stock ownership, equity interest, patent/licensing arrangements, etc) that might pose a conflict of interest in connection with the submitted article.
Each author certifies that his or her institution has approved the human protocol for this investigation and that all investigations were conducted in conformity with ethical principles of research, and that informed consent for participation in the study was obtained.
An erratum to this article can be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999-009-0778-x