Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

, Volume 467, Issue 1, pp 206–212

Revision of the Deficient Proximal Femur With a Proximal Femoral Allograft

  • Oleg Safir
  • Catherine F. Kellett
  • Michael Flint
  • David Backstein
  • Allan E. Gross
Symposium: Papers Presented at the Hip Society Meetings 2008

DOI: 10.1007/s11999-008-0573-0

Cite this article as:
Safir, O., Kellett, C.F., Flint, M. et al. Clin Orthop Relat Res (2009) 467: 206. doi:10.1007/s11999-008-0573-0

Abstract

Substantial bone loss is frequently encountered with revision hip arthroplasty. A proximal femoral allograft may be used to reconstitute bone stock in the multiply revised femur with segmental bone loss of greater than 5 cm. We retrospectively reviewed 92 patients (93 hips) who underwent such proximal femoral allografts. The average age at the surgery was 61 years. The average number of previous revision procedures was 2.5. Six patients were lost to followup. Thirty-four of 36 deceased patients had the original proximal femoral allograft at the time of death. The minimum followup for the 50 remaining patients was 15 years (average, 16.2 years; range, 15–22 years). Analysis included survivorship and radiographic assessment. Of the 50 patients reviewed, two had a failed reconstruction due to infection, six for aseptic loosening, three for nonunion, and four for dislocation. Revision of the proximal femoral allograft for all reasons excluding the acetabulum was performed in seven patients. At last followup, 42 patients (84%) had a well-functioning construct. Proximal femoral allograft for revision hip arthroplasty in femoral segmental bone loss is a durable alternative in most patients for a complex problem.

Level of Evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Copyright information

© The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Oleg Safir
    • 1
  • Catherine F. Kellett
    • 2
  • Michael Flint
    • 3
  • David Backstein
    • 1
  • Allan E. Gross
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai HospitalUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryNHS TaysideDundeeScotland, UK
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Middlemore OrthopaedicsMiddlemore HospitalAucklandNew Zealand