Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

, Volume 466, Issue 2, pp 273–280

Hip Damage Occurs at the Zone of Femoroacetabular Impingement

Authors

    • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, InselspitalUniversity of Bern
  • D. Goricki
    • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, InselspitalUniversity of Bern
  • M. Beck
    • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, InselspitalUniversity of Bern
  • S. B. Murphy
    • Center for Computer Assisted and Reconstructive Surgery, New England Baptist HospitalTufts University
  • K. A. Siebenrock
    • Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, InselspitalUniversity of Bern
International Hip Society Symposium

DOI: 10.1007/s11999-007-0061-y

Cite this article as:
Tannast, M., Goricki, D., Beck, M. et al. Clin Orthop Relat Res (2008) 466: 273. doi:10.1007/s11999-007-0061-y

Abstract

Although current concepts of anterior femoroacetabular impingement predict damage in the labrum and the cartilage, the actual joint damage has not been verified by computer simulation. We retrospectively compared the intraoperative locations of labral and cartilage damage of 40 hips during surgical dislocation for cam or pincer type femoroacetabular impingement (Group I) with the locations of femoroacetabular impingement in 15 additional hips using computer simulation (Group II). We found no difference between the mean locations of the chondrolabral damage of Group I and the computed impingement zone of Group II. The standard deviation was larger for measures of articular damage from Group I in comparison to the computed values of Group II. The most severe hip damage occurred at the zone of highest probability of femoroacetabular impact, typically in the anterosuperior quadrant of the acetabulum for both cam and pincer type femoroacetabular impingements. However, the extent of joint damage along the acetabular rim was larger intraoperatively than that observed on the images of the 3-D joint simulations. We concluded femoroacetabular impingement mechanism contributes to early osteoarthritis including labral lesions.

Level of Evidence: Level II, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Copyright information

© The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons 2008