Science and Engineering Ethics

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 433–437

Neuroscience May Supersede Ethics and Law

Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11948-012-9351-1

Cite this article as:
Scott, T.R. Sci Eng Ethics (2012) 18: 433. doi:10.1007/s11948-012-9351-1

Abstract

Advances in technology now make it possible to monitor the activity of the human brain in action, however crudely. As this emerging science continues to offer correlations between neural activity and mental functions, mind and brain may eventually prove to be one. If so, such a full comprehension of the electrochemical bases of mind may render current concepts of ethics, law, and even free will irrelevant.

Keywords

Functional MRIMagnetoencephalographyCrimeLawFree will

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.San Diego State UniversitySan DiegoUSA