, Volume 6, Issue 8, pp 2031-2047,
Open Access This content is freely available online to anyone, anywhere at any time.
Date: 24 Nov 2012

The Influence of Selected Osmotic Dehydration and Pretreatment Parameters on Dry Matter and Polyphenol Content in Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) Fruits

Abstract

The paper presents an assessment of the influence of selected highbush blueberry pretreatment methods and parameters on the process of osmotic dehydration conducted in 65 °Brix sucrose solution for 5 to 240 min at 30–70 °C. The pretreatment methods used included: fruit immersion in boiling water (15 s) and in 0.5 % NaOH solution (15 s at 95 °C), exposure to ultrasound at atmospheric pressure (vibration frequency of 35 ± 5 kHz, 500 W, for 15 min.) and at low pressure (0.92 kg cm−1), and enzymatic processing; pectinase (enzyme activity of 46,000 PGU/mL; 0.6 mL/90 g of fruits; 30 min at approx. 22 °C) and lipase (enzyme activity of 750 PGU/mL; 0.7 mL/90 g of fruits; 30 min at approx. 22 °C) were used. Dehydration was also conducted in the presence of pectinolytic enzymes. The dehydrated material was analyzed in terms of the content of dry matter, total polyphenols, and particular polyphenols using high performance liquid chromatography. It was observed that dehydration was much more intensive at 60 and 70 °C, but such temperatures led to substantial losses of phenolic compounds (by 15–30 % after 2-h dehydration) and unfavorable changes in the texture of the final product. A promising method of pretreatment is fruit immersion in solutions containing pectinolytic and lipolytic enzymes, which increase dry matter content by 26 % (after 1 h of dehydration at 30 °C) with a low loss of phenolic compounds (4 %). Among the identified anthocyanins, the greatest retention during dehydration at various temperatures was displayed by petunidin-3-galactoside (over 80 % after 1 h of dehydration) and petunidin-3-glucoside (over 78 %).