Food and Bioprocess Technology

, Volume 1, Issue 1, pp 2–34

Recent Advances in the Use of High Pressure as an Effective Processing Technique in the Food Industry

Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11947-007-0007-0

Cite this article as:
Norton, T. & Sun, DW. Food Bioprocess Technol (2008) 1: 2. doi:10.1007/s11947-007-0007-0
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Abstract

High pressure processing is a food processing method which has shown great potential in the food industry. Similar to heat treatment, high pressure processing inactivates microorganisms, denatures proteins and extends the shelf life of food products. But in the meantime, unlike heat treatments, high pressure treatment can also maintain the quality of fresh foods, with little effects on flavour and nutritional value. Furthermore, the technique is independent of the size, shape or composition of products. In this paper, many aspects associated with applying high pressure as a processing method in the food industry are reviewed, including operating principles, effects on food quality and safety and most recent commercial and research applications. It is hoped that this review will promote more widespread applications of the technology to the food industry.

Keywords

High pressure HPP HPLT Low temperature Inactivation Enzyme Microorganism Shelf life Food quality Food safety Freezing Thawing 

Nomenclature

P

pressure (Pa)

T

temperature (°C)

ρ

density (kg m−3)

η

viscosity (Pa s)

Cp

specific heat (W kg−1 K−1)

D

characteristic length (m)

k

inactivation constant

λ

thermal conductivity (W/m1 K)

t

time

α

thermal expansion coefficient (K−1)

A, B, C

mass of each designated food component

CH

compression heating (°C)

Subscripts

M

food medium

W

water

p

food product

pp

food product packaging

hyd_me

hydraulic mechanisms in processing medium

hyd_p

hydraulic mechanisms in product

th_me

thermal conduction in processing medium

th_p

thermal conduction in food product

th_pp

thermal conduction in product packaging

in

inactivation

x, y, z

designated food component

food

composite food material

Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Food Refrigeration and Computerised Food Technology Group, University College DublinNational University of IrelandDublin 2Ireland

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