Current Treatment Options in Neurology

, Volume 3, Issue 6, pp 495–506

Long-term medical treatment for Parkinson’s disease

Authors

  • John M. Bertoni
    • Department of NeurologyCreighton University School of Medicine
  • Jose-Luis Prendes
    • Department of NeurologyCreighton University School of Medicine
  • Pamela Sprenkle
    • Department of NeurologyCreighton University School of Medicine
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11940-001-0012-y

Cite this article as:
Bertoni, J.M., Prendes, J. & Sprenkle, P. Curr Treat Options Neurol (2001) 3: 495. doi:10.1007/s11940-001-0012-y

Opinion statement

The authors of this paper view Parkinson’s disease (PD) as a clinically defined progressive syndrome of resting limb tremor, bradykinesia, muscle rigidity, and a shuffling unsteady gait that responds well to dopaminergic medications. Parkinson’s disease is a not a single entity, but rather a syndrome with diverse causes, with both genetic and environmental risk factors [1••]. The clinician’s concern is to rule out other entities, especially those having another specific treatment, and to give PD patients the best short- and long-term benefit, with the least possible unwanted side effects.

Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2001