Current Treatment Options in Cardiovascular Medicine

, Volume 3, Issue 6, pp 481–492

Diabetic cardiomyopathy

  • Susanne Trost
  • Martin LeWinter
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11936-001-0022-9

Cite this article as:
Trost, S. & LeWinter, M. Curr Treat Options Cardio Med (2001) 3: 481. doi:10.1007/s11936-001-0022-9

Opinion statement

Diabetes mellitus is a major risk factor for the development of congestive heart failure (CHF). Diabetic cardiomyopathy has been acknowledged as a distinct disease entity that is an additional risk for diabetic patients to develop CHF, especially when they are affected by hypertension or epicardial coronary artery disease. Moreover, diabetic cardiomyopathy has been documented to lead to CHF even in the absence of other risk factors. As the combination of hypertension and diabetes has shown to be particularly detrimental, aggressive blood pressure control with a goal of less than 130/85 mm Hg is of critical importance. The first choice for pharmacologic treatment is angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors. Double- or triple-drug therapy is frequently required for good control. The increased risk of epicardial coronary artery disease in patients with diabetes warrants stringent treatment of dyslipidemia. If dilated cardiomyopathy with low ejection fraction is present, therapy with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, digoxin, diuretics, beta-blockers, and spironolactone (for patients with New York Heart Association class III to IV functional status) is indicated. If cardiac dysfunction consists predominantly of impaired diastolic function, heart rate control with a beta-blocker or a calcium antagonist is of particular importance. Control of blood glucose should be achieved, with hemoglobin A1c levels of less than 7%. Hyperinsulinemia should be avoided when possible; therefore, insulin-sensitizing agents are preferred over insulin-secretion-enhancing agents. Symptoms of CHF and acutely decompensated CHF should be treated no differently than nondiabetic patients. Care for patients with diabetes always includes lifestyle changes consisting of smoking cessation, decreasing obesity, regular exercise, and a heart-healthy diabetic diet.

Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susanne Trost
    • 1
  • Martin LeWinter
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of CardiologyUniversity of Vermont College of Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health CareBurlingtonUSA