Current Psychiatry Reports

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 335–344

Alterations of Cortical GABA Neurons and Network Oscillations in Schizophrenia

  • Guillermo Gonzalez-Burgos
  • Takanori Hashimoto
  • David A. Lewis
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11920-010-0124-8

Cite this article as:
Gonzalez-Burgos, G., Hashimoto, T. & Lewis, D.A. Curr Psychiatry Rep (2010) 12: 335. doi:10.1007/s11920-010-0124-8

Abstract

The hypothesis that alterations of cortical inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons are a central element in the pathology of schizophrenia has emerged from a series of postmortem studies. How such abnormalities may contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia has been substantially informed by a convergence with basic neuroscience studies revealing complex details of GABA neuron function in the healthy brain. Importantly, activity of the parvalbumin-containing class of GABA neurons has been linked to the production of cortical network oscillations. Furthermore, growing knowledge supports the concept that γ band oscillations (30–80 Hz) are an essential mechanism for cortical information transmission and processing. Herein we review recent studies further indicating that inhibition from parvalbumin-positive GABA neurons is necessary to produce γ oscillations in cortical circuits; provide an update on postmortem studies documenting that deficits in the expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase67, which accounts for most GABA synthesis in the cortex, are widely observed in schizophrenia; and describe studies using novel, noninvasive approaches directly assessing potential relations between alterations in GABA, oscillations, and cognitive function in schizophrenia.

Keywords

Neocortex Synaptic inhibition Cognitive deficit Synchronization GABA Schizophrenia 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guillermo Gonzalez-Burgos
    • 1
  • Takanori Hashimoto
    • 2
  • David A. Lewis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Translational Neuroscience ProgramUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryKanazawa UniversityKanazawaJapan