Headache and Obesity in the Pediatric Population

  • Christopher B. Oakley
  • Ann I. Scher
  • Ana Recober
  • B. Lee Peterlin
Childhood and Adolescent Headache (S Evers, Section Editor)

DOI: 10.1007/s11916-014-0416-5

Cite this article as:
Oakley, C.B., Scher, A.I., Recober, A. et al. Curr Pain Headache Rep (2014) 18: 416. doi:10.1007/s11916-014-0416-5
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Childhood and Adolescent Headache

Abstract

Childhood obesity and headache are both significant health concerns that often have a marked impact both personally and socially, that if not addressed can carry over into adulthood. For many individuals, these effects may be magnified when obesity and headache are seen in conjunction. It is this overlap between obesity and headache in children, as well as similarities in the known mechanism of action for feeding and headache, which led to a suspected association between the two. Unfortunately, although recent studies have supported this association, only a limited number have been conducted to directly address this. Furthermore, despite rising rates of childhood obesity and headache, the associated medical comorbidities, and the significant financial cost for these conditions, there is a relative void in studies investigating treatment options that address both underlying conditions of obesity and headache in children.

Keywords

Migraine Headache Pediatric Adolescents Obesity BMI 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher B. Oakley
    • 1
  • Ann I. Scher
    • 2
  • Ana Recober
    • 3
  • B. Lee Peterlin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, JHUSOM Headache ResearchJohns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Preventive Medicine and BiometricsUniformed Services UniversityBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Department of NeurologyUniversity of IowaIowa CityUSA