Current Pain and Headache Reports

, Volume 15, Issue 1, pp 39–46

Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Pain: An Evidence-based Review

Authors

  • Nadya M. Dhanani
    • Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain MedicineMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School
  • Thomas J. Caruso
    • Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain MedicineMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School
    • Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care and Pain MedicineMassachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11916-010-0158-y

Cite this article as:
Dhanani, N.M., Caruso, T.J. & Carinci, A.J. Curr Pain Headache Rep (2011) 15: 39. doi:10.1007/s11916-010-0158-y

Abstract

Pain is one of the most prevalent conditions for which patients seek medical attention. Additionally, the number of patients who utilize complementary and alternative medicine as a treatment of pain either in lieu of, or concurrent with, standard conventional treatments continues to grow. While research into the mechanisms, side effect profiles, and efficacies of these alternative therapies has increased in recent years, much more remains unknown and untested. Herein, we review the literature on complementary and alternative medicine for pain, with particular emphasis on evidence-based assessments pertinent to the most common alternative therapies, including acupuncture, herbal therapy, massage therapy, hypnosis, tai chi, and biofeedback.

Keywords

Complementary medicineAlternative medicineHolisticMind–BodyPainPain treatmentAcupunctureHerbal therapyHypnosisTai chiMassage therapyBiofeedbackEvidence

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010