Current Oncology Reports

, Volume 2, Issue 6, pp 524–528

Therapy for acute myeloid leukemia: Intensive timing of induction chemotherapy

  • Robert J. Wells
  • William G. Woods
  • Jonathan D. Buckley
  • Robert J. Arceci
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s11912-000-0106-9

Cite this article as:
Wells, R.J., Woods, W.G., Buckley, J.D. et al. Curr Oncol Rep (2000) 2: 524. doi:10.1007/s11912-000-0106-9
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Abstract

Children’s Cancer Group (CCG) study 2891 for children with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia enrolled more than 1200 patients between 1989 and 1995. This study showed that increased dose intensity during induction therapy improved survival for all patients except those with Down syndrome, where it proved harmful. Although increased dose intensity improved survival, it did not improve remission induction rate, indicating that the quality of remissions varies. This finding complicates the evaluation of postremission therapy options, which CCG 2891 also evaluated. Survival with related-donor allogeneic bone marrow transplantation was superior to survival with both purged autologous bone marrow transplantation and a more standard chemotherapy consolidation, whereas survival for autologous transplantation and chemotherapy was equivalent.

Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert J. Wells
    • 1
  • William G. Woods
    • 2
  • Jonathan D. Buckley
    • 3
  • Robert J. Arceci
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Hematology/OncologyChildren’s Hospital Medical CenterCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.South Carolina Cancer CenterUniversity of South CarolinaColumbiaUSA
  3. 3.Norris Comprehensive Cancer CenterUniversity of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, and Children’s Cancer GroupArcadiaUSA

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