Current Hypertension Reports

, 16:424

Autoimmunity: An Underlying Factor in the Pathogenesis of Hypertension

  • Keisa W. Mathis
  • Hanna J. Broome
  • Michael J. Ryan
Antihypertensive Agents: Mechanisms of Drug Action (HM Siragy and B Waeber, Section Editors)

DOI: 10.1007/s11906-014-0424-1

Cite this article as:
Mathis, K.W., Broome, H.J. & Ryan, M.J. Curr Hypertens Rep (2014) 16: 424. doi:10.1007/s11906-014-0424-1
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Antihypertensive Agents: Mechanisms of Drug Action

Abstract

One in every three adults in the United States has hypertension, and the underlying cause of most of these cases is unknown. Therefore, it is imperative to continue the study of mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Decades ago, studies speculated that elements of an autoimmune response were associated with the development of hypertension based, in part, on the presence of circulating autoantibodies in hypertensive patients. In the past decade, a growing number of studies have been published supporting the concept that self-antigens and the subsequent activation of the adaptive immune system promote the development of hypertension. This manuscript will provide a brief review of the evidence supporting a role for the immune system in the development of hypertension, studies that implicate both cell-mediated and humoral immunity, and the relevance of understanding blood pressure control in an autoimmune disease model with hypertension.

Keywords

Adaptive immunityAutoantibodiesAutoimmunityB cellsBlood pressureImmune systemInflammationLupusSystemic lupus erythematosusSLET cells

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Keisa W. Mathis
    • 1
  • Hanna J. Broome
    • 1
  • Michael J. Ryan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsUniversity of Mississippi Medical CenterJacksonUSA