Current Hypertension Reports

, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp 232–237

Role of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Resistant Hypertension

  • Guido Grassi
  • Michele Bombelli
  • Gino Seravalle
  • Gianmaria Brambilla
  • Raffaella Dell’Oro
  • Giuseppe Mancia
Therapeutic Trials (G Mancia, Section Editor)

DOI: 10.1007/s11906-013-0349-0

Cite this article as:
Grassi, G., Bombelli, M., Seravalle, G. et al. Curr Hypertens Rep (2013) 15: 232. doi:10.1007/s11906-013-0349-0

Abstract

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has gained growing popularity in the diagnosis and treatment of essential hypertension for several reasons, such as the lack of the so-called white-coat effect, the greater reproducibility as compared with clinic blood pressure, the ability to provide information on blood pressure phenomena of prognostic value and the closer relationship with the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. All the above-mentioned main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring are also true for resistant hypertension. In addition, however, in resistant hypertension, blood pressure monitoring allows one to precisely define the diagnosis of this clinical condition, by excluding the presence of white-coat hypertension, which is responsible for a consistent number of “false” resistant hypertensive cases. The approach also allows one to define the patterns of blood pressure variability in this clinical condition, as well as its relationships with target organ damage. Finally, it allows one to assess the effects of therapeutic interventions, such as renal nerves ablation, aimed at improving blood pressure control in this hypertensive state. The present paper will critically review the main features of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in resistant hypertension, with particular emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of this high-risk hypertensive state.

Keywords

Ambulatory blood pressure monitoringABPMBlood pressure variabilityRenal denervationWhite coat hypertensionOrgan damageResistant hypertension

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guido Grassi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Michele Bombelli
    • 1
  • Gino Seravalle
    • 1
  • Gianmaria Brambilla
    • 1
  • Raffaella Dell’Oro
    • 1
  • Giuseppe Mancia
    • 1
  1. 1.Clinica Medica, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica, Prevenzione e Biotecnologie SanitarieUniversità Milano-Bicocca, Ospedale San GerardoMonzaItaly
  2. 2.IRCCS MultimedicaSesto San GiovanniItaly