, Volume 12, Issue 5, pp 369-377
Date: 12 Aug 2010

Does Blockade of the Renin-Angiotensin-Aldosterone System Slow Progression of All Forms of Kidney Disease?

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Abstract

The velocity of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression is only partly dependent on the nature and activity of the underlying disease process. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) is a crucial, and often universal, event responsible for the pathophysiologic mechanisms that accelerate CKD progression. Thus, it would appear that interruption of the RAAS through the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists, or direct renin inhibitors can play a principal role in slowing CKD progression, regardless of the cause. Unfortunately, applying this generalized approach to all forms of CKD has been delayed by the lack of strong, evidence-based data. The aim of this review is to provide the most current evidence available for the use of RAAS blockade as a method of slowing the progression of the various forms of CKD.