Article

Current Hypertension Reports

, Volume 6, Issue 5, pp 357-362

First online:

Hypertension and dementia: Does blood pressure control favorably affect cognition?

  • Elizabeth I. MajeskiAffiliated withPrimary Care (11C), Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center
  • , Colin E. WidenerAffiliated withPrimary Care (11C), Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center
  • , Jan BasileAffiliated withPrimary Care (11C), Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center

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Abstract

Dementia and aging are not synonymous. Dementia is a progressive deterioration in cognitive and social and/or occupational functions that can eventually impair a patient’s ability to live independently. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. It accounts for 50% to 70% of all patients with dementia. Vascular dementia, responsible for up to 15% of all diagnosed cases, is the second most common form of dementia. Hypertension remains a significant risk factor for vascular dementia. The optimal level of blood pressure control for the prevention of dementia and whether one particular class of antihypertensive drug is more beneficial than another remains uncertain.