Current HIV/AIDS Reports

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 500–515

Youth, Technology, and HIV: Recent Advances and Future Directions

  • Lisa B. Hightow-Weidman
  • Kathryn E. Muessig
  • Jose Bauermeister
  • Chen Zhang
  • Sara LeGrand
HIV and Technology (J Simoni and K Horvath, Section Editors)

DOI: 10.1007/s11904-015-0280-x

Cite this article as:
Hightow-Weidman, L.B., Muessig, K.E., Bauermeister, J. et al. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep (2015) 12: 500. doi:10.1007/s11904-015-0280-x
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on HIV and Technology

Abstract

Technology, including mobile technologies and social media, offers powerful tools to reach, engage, and retain youth and young adults in HIV prevention and care interventions both in the USA and globally. In this report, we focus on HIV, technology, and youth, presenting a synthesis of recently published (Jan 2014–May 2015) observational and experimental studies relevant for understanding and intervening on HIV risk, prevention, and care. We present findings from a selection of the 66 relevant citations identified, highlighting studies that demonstrate a novel approach to technology interventions among youth in regard to content, delivery, target population, or public health impact. We discuss current trends globally and in the USA in how youth are using technology, as well as emergent research issues in this field—including the need for new theories for developing technology-based HIV interventions and new metrics of engagement, exposure, and evaluation.

Keywords

mHealth eHealth Internet HIV Mobile phone Smartphone Social media Intervention Youth Adolescent Teen 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa B. Hightow-Weidman
    • 1
  • Kathryn E. Muessig
    • 2
  • Jose Bauermeister
    • 3
  • Chen Zhang
    • 2
  • Sara LeGrand
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Department of Health BehaviorUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillChapel HillUSA
  3. 3.Department of Health Behavior and Health Education School of Public HealthUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  4. 4.Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research Duke Global Health InstituteDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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