Current HIV/AIDS Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 273–282

Clostridium Difficile Infection in Patients with HIV/AIDS

Co-infections (MA Jacobson, Section Editor)

DOI: 10.1007/s11904-013-0162-z

Cite this article as:
Collini, P.J., Kuijper, E. & Dockrell, D.H. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep (2013) 10: 273. doi:10.1007/s11904-013-0162-z

Abstract

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) affects significant numbers of hospitalized patients and is an increasing problem in the community. It is also among the most commonly isolated pathogens in HIV patients with diarrheal illness and is ≥2 fold more common in HIV-seropositive individuals. This association is stronger in those with low absolute CD4 T cell counts or meeting clinical criteria for an AIDS diagnosis, and was most pronounced before the wide availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy. The presentation and outcome of CDI in HIV appears similar to the general population. The increased risk can in part be attributed to increased hospitalization and antimicrobial use, but HIV related alterations in fecal microbiota, gut mucosal integrity, and humoral and cell mediated immunity are also likely to play a role. Here we review the evidence for these observations and the relevance of recent advances in the diagnosis and management of CDI for the HIV clinician.

Keywords

HIVHIV/AIDSCo-infectionsC. difficile infectionClostridium difficile infection (CDI)Immunocompromise

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul J. Collini
    • 1
  • Ed Kuijper
    • 2
  • David H. Dockrell
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Infection and ImmunityThe University of Sheffield Medical School & Sheffield Teaching HospitalsSheffieldUK
  2. 2.Department of Medical MicrobiologyLeiden University Medical CenterLeidenNetherlands
  3. 3.Department of Infection and ImmunityThe University of Sheffield Medical School & Sheffield Teaching HospitalsSheffieldUK